What you need to know about fringe benefits tax

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What you need to know about fringe benefits tax
What you need to know about fringe benefits tax

A fringe benefits tax (FBT) is a tax paid on benefits provided to employees (usually non-cash). FBT is calculated based on the gross taxable value of benefits employers provide to their employees. Employees must lodge their return and pay the total FBT amount they owe for the previous FBT year. Due to COVID-19, the FBT lodgement deadline has been extended from 31 March 2020 to 25 June 2020.

The following are the types of fringe benefits you must lodge before the extended due date:

  • Car fringe benefits: when a car your business owns or leases is available for employee private usage.
  • Debt waiver fringe benefits: when you waive or forgive an employee’s debt (including those you write-off as a genuine bad debt).
  • Loan fringe benefits: when you provide a loan to an employee and charge a low rate of interest or no interest during the GBT year.
  • Expense payment fringe benefits: when you reimburse an employee for expenses they incur or pay a third party for expenses incurred by an employee.
  • Housing fringe benefits: when you provide an employee with accommodation as a usual place of residence for the employee.
  • Living-away-from-home allowance fringe benefits: any payments you make to compensate an employee for any disadvantages suffered because they have to live away from home to be employed at your business.
  • Airline transport fringe benefits: any payments made in relation to airline transport.
  • Board fringe benefits: meals provided to employees.
  • Entertainment fringe benefits: payments for entertainment by the way of food, drink or recreation.
  • Tax-exempt body entertainment fringe benefits: when you incur entertainment expenses and you are wholly or partially exempt from income tax or don’t derive assessable income from the activities related to the entertainment.
  • Car parking fringe benefits: when you provide car parking for your employee.
  • Property fringe benefits: when you provide free or discounted property (including goods such as electricity and gas, real property and rights to property) to an employee.
  • Residual fringe benefits: broadly speaking, any rights, privileges, services or facilities provided in respect of employment.

Businesses who have paid less than $3000 in FBT in the previous year only need to make one payment when lodging their FBT this financial year. For businesses with more than $3000 in FBT, they must lodge their FBT quarterly. Clarify with your tax agent or accountant for your FBT details before lodging.

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